Guardianship and/or Conservatorship

The fact that a person is elderly, mentally ill, developmentally disabled or physically disabled does not necessarily indicate a need for guardianship or conservatorship. In many cases, alternatives to guardianship and/or conservatorship should be used.  Whenever possible, less intrusive options should be pursued in order to preserve a person’s autonomy and self-determination. Guardianship or conservatorship should be considered a last resort.


Guardianship is the most restrictive and intrusive form of intervention that can be imposed on an individual and significantly impacts many civil rights, including the right to vote, drive, decide where to live, make medical decisions, etc.  Once established, it can be extremely difficult to revoke a guardianship or conservatorship even if the guardian or conservator believes it is no longer necessary. You may want to consult an attorney familiar with guardianships/conservatorships before you proceed.

If you are sure there is no other alternative, any family or friends willing or qualified to serve, and after careful consideration, guardianship or conservatorship is still something that should be considered please complete the form below.


Please note you must be willing to testify in court to any information provided in your referral. A referral will open an investigation into the possible need for guardianship/conservatorship; a referral is not a guarantee that a guardian or conservator will be sought.


Click here for the Guardianship Referral Form